The Rise of the Swipe

When Tinder came on the scene in 2012, it came with a new, revolutionary user experience design that made dating fun. Potential matches were no longer hidden behind a sea of interests, long bios, or probability statistics. Instead, the difference between human connection and human rejection all rest in the swipe. Before Tinder, dating apps were a complicated affair. Tinder was one of the first dating services to capture the millennial audience by introducing the swipe, an incredibly simple mechanic that made online dating more fun. Don’t take my word for it. According to the most recent data from Tinder in February, 1.8 billion swipes a day take place on the platform, and that was back in November of 2015. From its launch in 2012, Tinder has experienced what is called a network effect. The network effect is a phenomenon whereby a good or service becomes more valuable when more people use it. Tinder has created the first dating-social media hybrid, and we have yet to see its full impact on the social media space.

According to Cowen and Company, users of the service spend roughly 35 minutes per day on the app and swipe left or right 140 times. Users are highly engaged on the platform, and many advertisers are beginning to take note. Tinder has been slow to accept advertising partners since release, and part of that reason is to, bad branding doesn’t dilute the platform. Sean Rad, the founder of Tinder, also thinks that the brand has a bright future. “Our ad business is still in its infancy, but we are experimenting and creating a bigger team as we get more serious. There will be a major push on our advertising business next year, but when we work with brands, we want to ensure that their advertising doesn’t take away from the delight of the user’s Tinder experience. It must be authentic.”

While they haven’t opened the floodgates to advertisers yet. While Tinder is looking towards the future, ultimately, advertisers will decide whether to swipe right or not on the platform.

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